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European Filmmakers and Fair Use

As U.S. documentary filmmakers have increasingly benefited from the copyright doctrine of Fair Use, European documentary filmmakers have cast about for how to similarly benefit. The trouble is, instead of the broad and flexible Fair Use doctrine, the many European nations instead have a variety of specific and inflexible exceptions and limitations. Read more...

Should Online Video Look More like Wikipedia or TV?

A clutch of people concerned with the future of online video, including Center director Pat Aufderheide, met at Yale on October 31 to talk about what it would take to make creating an online video look a little more like, say, creating a text document to share on the Internet. Read more...

Journalistic principles

Nick Couldry, a senior scholar in the philosophy of communication who writes on media and public life at Goldsmiths, University of London, visited last week to talk about ethics and journalism. He pointed to the declining standards for accuracy, truth and public responsibility in ever-more-economically-stressed newspapers, and to the absence of standards bodies that can provide principles rather than prescriptions. Read more...

Campaign videos--Fair Use, not infringement

Political campaigns have been busily clipping out snippets of news coverage and building them into campaign videos. And the TV networks have just as busily been sending demands to YouTube and other video sites to remove those videos as violation of copyright. Only problem: they’re not violations of copyright. They’re fully within the umbrella of Fair Use—the right to use copyrighted material without permission or payment in some cases. Learn more at the Center’s Fair Use site. Read more...

Wikipedia’s Town Hall on Sarah Palin Techn

Some time ago, I argued that you could see Wikipedia as "the new town hall." Wikipedia entries aren’t stable encyclopedia entries, even if they look like it; they are active, constantly morphing sites of public discussion about how to understand something.
Others have made this point repeatedly, and probably Yochai Benkler has put the frame around the argument most authoritatively, in his Wealth of Networks. Read more...