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Future of Public Media

Confused about Public Media? Check out the Center's new FAQ!

Communicating about shared issues—whether it’s traffic congestion in the neighborhood, lower wages for women, or the concerns of the families of soldiers not receiving adequate body armor—builds a group’s awareness of itself as a public. The Center's new Frequently Asked Questions: Public Media, by Center Director Pat Aufderheide and Research Fellow 6, helps to clarify exactly what public media is, how it's used, and why it's so important to a democratic society. Read more...

Our Very Own Participatory Media at MiT5

It was a real joy in the last weekend of April to be part of Media in Transition 5, the party that the cultural studies folks at MIT throw for their friends.(Sample the guest list and other goodies at http://web.mit.edu/comm-forum/mit5/.) In the best spirit of Henry Jenkins' Convergence Culture (the title of his latest book), the event was participatory and multimedia. Craig Watkins from University of Texas at Austin talked about hip hop culture, and Mimi Ito from University of Southern California stuck up for Pokemon culture. Read more...

How is public media making a difference in the Arab world?

The Center for Social Media collaborated with the Arab Media and Public Life (AMPLE) project at American University for a year-long conference series on public media in the Arab world and focused on changes in the media environment, the role of the state, and what "public media" means in the Arab world. The Center’s latest report highlights the proceedings of the project. Click here to download the full report.

How is public media making a difference in the Arab world?

The Center for Social Media collaborated with the Arab Media and Public Life (AMPLE) project at American University for a year-long conference series on public media in the Arab world and focused on changes in the media environment, the role of the state, and what "public media" means in the Arab world. The Center’s latest report highlights the proceedings of the project. Click here to download the full report.

Freeing the Data in London

How much access should members of the public have to the data and media projects that their tax dollars fund? How about corporations looking to make a buck from government-financed data? Does information really "want to be free," as Stewart Brand famously pronounced more than two decades ago, and if so, who’s going to pay for its production?Read more...