Empowering Media That Matters
Home >> Blog >> Future of Public Media

Future of Public Media

FCC Seeks Comments on Open Internet

FCCThe Federal Communications Commission has opened the door for public comments on how to regulate Internet service, the issue widely known as “net neutrality.”  Many public interest organizations are urging citizens, especially media makers, to contribute.

Internet service providers such as Verizon and Comcast can, both in theory and practice, favor some kinds of traffic over others for their own purposes.  Read more...

AIR Challenges Public Media to “Go Outside”

What's Outside?A recent report published by the Association for Independents in Radio (AIR) found that the public media system “is ready, willing, and able to take bold moves” to utilize new media technologies, reach across platforms, and touch more audiences.

The report, titled “What’s Outside?” in keeping with AIR’s focus on thinking outside the box, is an evaluative summary of key takeaways from AIR’s Localore initiative. It is also a call to action for public media. Read more...

FCC’s New Net Neutrality Rules: Bad for Media That Matters

InternetThe FCC’s proposed “net neutrality” rules, scheduled for public input on May 15, could make it harder for people who make media that matters to reach people who can use their work. 

Public-interest nonprofits including Free Press, Public Knowledge, Demand Progress, and Common Cause are calling foul play on the FCC’s decision to allow big content companies like Netflix to buy preferential treatment from Internet service providers. Specifically, the new policy would allow ISPs to charge for faster content delivery, as long as it’s “commercially reasonable.” Read more...

Dissecting Impact for Public Media

Dissection DThe Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR) embarked over the last several months on a series of conversations around the country called Dissection, workshops “devoted to deepening our sense of what media impact is, how to measure it and why it matters.” They brought together key journalists, documentary filmmakers, industry leaders, foundations and academics, culminating in Dissection D: Impact, hosted at American University. Read more...

SXSW: Unbranded and Branded Content, Documentarians, and Journalists

Beginning with the EndBranded content, from advertising to sponsored work, has long used the skills of filmmakers and (often ex-) journalists. At SXSW 2014, unbranded content--sponsored but without an obvious pitch for product or even necessarily a direct link to the sponsor--was in full flourish, with companies recruiting for talent.  The biggest question for recruits may be ethics. Read more...